Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Condition  Expression
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2017 ; 27(2): 207~218

AuthorHadi Bayat, Meysam Omidi, Masoumeh Rajabibazl, Suriana Sabri, Azam Rahimpour
AffiliationMedical Nano-Technology & Tissue Engineering Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran,Department of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
TitleThe CRISPR Growth Spurt: from Bench to Clinic on Versatile Small RNAs
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2017 ; 27(2): 207~218
AbstractClustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in association with CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) is an adaptive immune system, playing a pivotal role in the defense of bacteria and archaea. Ease of handling and cost effectiveness make the CRISPR-Cas system an ideal programmable nuclease tool. Recent advances in understanding the CRISPRCas system have tremendously improved its efficiency. For instance, it is possible to recapitulate the chronicle CRISPR-Cas from its infancy and inaugurate a developed version by generating novel variants of Cas proteins, subduing off-target effects, and optimizing of innovative strategies. In summary, the CRISPR-Cas system could be employed in a number of applications, including providing model systems, rectification of detrimental mutations, and antiviral therapies.
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KeywordsCRISPR-Cas system, DNA repair, adoptive immunity, genome editing
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