Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2020 ; Vol.30-2: 163~171

AuthorHyoung-Geun Kim, Davin Jang, Young Sung Jung, Hyun-Ji Oh, Seon Min Oh, Yeong-Geun Lee, Se Chan Kang, Dae-Ok Kim, Dae Young Lee, Nam-In Baek
Place of dutyGraduate School of Biotechnology and Department of Oriental Medicinal Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104, Republic of Korea
TitleAnti-Inflammatory Effect of Flavonoids from Brugmansia arborea L. Flowers
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2020 ; Vol.30-2
AbstractBrugmansia arborea L. (Solanaceae), commonly known as “angel’s trumpet,” is widely grown in North America, Africa, Australia, and Asia. It has been mainly used for ornamental purposes as well as analgesic, anti-rheumatic, vulnerary, decongestant, and anti-spasmodic materials. B. arborea is also reported to show anti-cholinergic activity, for which many alkaloids were reported to be principally responsible. However, to the best of our knowledge, a phytochemical study of B. arborea flowers has not yet been performed. Four flavonol glycosides (1–4) and one dihydroflavanol (5) were for the first time isolated from B. arborea flowers in this study. The flavonoids showed significant antioxidant capacities, suppressed nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 cells, and reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) protein production increased by LPS treatment. The contents of compounds 1–4 in n-BuOH fraction were determined to be 3.8 ± 0.9%, 2.2 ± 0.5%, 20.3 ± 1.1%, and 2.3 ± 0.4%, respectively, and that of compound 5 in EtOAc fraction was determined to be 12.7 ± 0.7%, by HPLC experiment. These results suggest that flavonol glycosides (1–4) and dihydroflavanol (5) can serve as index components of B. arborea flowers in standardizing anti-inflammatory materials.
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Supplemental Data
Key_wordCOX-2, flavonol glycoside, HPLC, nitric oxide, RAW 264.7, iNOS
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