Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2019 ; Vol.29-7: 1053~1060

AuthorJi Su Lee, Bomi Kim, Jae Hwan Kim, Minju Jeong, Seokwon Lim, Sanguine Byun
Place of dutyIncheon National University, Republic of Korea
TitleEffect of Differential Thermal Drying Conditions on the Immunomodulatory Function of Ginger
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2019 ; Vol.29-7
AbstractThermal drying is a common process used in the food industry for the modification of agricultural products. However, while various studies have investigated the alteration in physiochemical properties and chemical composition after drying, research focusing on the relationship between different dehydration conditions and bioactivity is scarce. In the current study, we prepared dried ginger under nine different conditions by varying the processing time and temperature and compared their immunomodulatory effects. Interestingly, depending on the drying condition, there were significant differences in the immunestimulating activity of the dried ginger samples. Gingers processed at 50oC 1h displayed the strongest activation of macrophages measured by TNF-α and IL-6 levels, whereas, freezedried or 70oC- and 90oC-dried ginger showed little effect. Similar results were recapitulated in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, further confirming that different dehydration conditions can cause significant differences in the immune-stimulating activity of ginger. Induction of ERK, p38, and JNK signaling was found to be the major underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the immunomodulatory effect of ginger. These results highlight the potential to improve the bioactivity of functional foods by selectively controlling processing conditions.
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Key_wordThermal drying, ginger, immunomodulation, MAPK pathway
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