Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2019 ; Vol.29-3: 357~366

AuthorDang Hai Dang Nguyen, Sung-Hoon Park, Phuong Lan Tran, Jung-Wan Kim, Quang Tri Le, Winfried Boos, Jong-Tae Park
Place of dutyDepartment of Foodservice Management and Nutrition, Sangmyung University
TitleCharacterization of the Transglycosylation Reaction of 4-α-Glucanotransferase (MalQ) and Its Role in Glycogen Breakdown in Escherichia coli
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2019 ; Vol.29-3
AbstractWe first confirmed the involvement of MalQ (4-α-glucanotransferase) in Escherichia coli glycogen breakdown by both in vitro and in vivo assays. In vivo tests of the knock-out mutant, ΔmalQ, showed that glycogen slowly decreased after the stationary phase compared to the wild-type strain, indicating the involvement of MalQ in glycogen degradation. In vitro assays incubated glycogen-mimic substrate, branched cyclodextrin (maltotetraosyl-β-CD: G4- β-CD) and glycogen phosphorylase (GlgP)-limit dextrin with a set of variable combinations of E. coli enzymes, including GlgX (debranching enzyme), MalP (maltodextrin phosphorylase), GlgP and MalQ. In the absence of GlgP, the reaction of MalP, GlgX and MalQ on substrates produced glucose-1-P (glc-1-P) 3-fold faster than without MalQ. The results revealed that MalQ led to disproportionate G4 released from GlgP-limit dextrin to another acceptor, G4, which is phosphorylated by MalP. In contrast, in the absence of MalP, the reaction of GlgX, GlgP and MalQ resulted in a 1.6-fold increased production of glc-1-P than without MalQ. The result indicated that the G4-branch chains of GlgP-limit dextrin are released by GlgX hydrolysis, and then MalQ transfers the resultant G4 either to another branch chain or another G4 that can immediately be phosphorylated into glc-1-P by GlgP. Thus, we propose a model of two possible MalQ-involved pathways in glycogen degradation. The operon structure of MalP-defecting enterobacteria strongly supports the involvement of MalQ and GlgP as alternative pathways in glycogen degradation.
Full-Text
Key_wordGlycogen degradation, MalQ, Escherichia coli, 4-a-glucanotransferase, transglycosylation
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