Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2019 ; Vol.29-3: 347~356

AuthorZhuang Yao, Jeong A Kim, Jeong Hwan Kim
Place of dutyGyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea,
TitleCharacterization of a Fibrinolytic Enzyme Secreted by Bacillus velezensis BS2 Isolated from Sea Squirt Jeotgal
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2019 ; Vol.29-3
AbstractBacillus sp. BS2 showing strong fibrinolytic activity was isolated from sea squirt (munggae) jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood. BS2 was identified as B. velezensis by molecular biological methods. B. velezensis BS2 grows well at 15% NaCl and at 10oC. When B. velezensis BS2 was cultivated in TSB broth for 96 h at 37oC, the culture showed the highest fibrinolytic activity (131.15 mU/μl) at 96 h. Three bands of 27, 35 and 60 kDa were observed from culture supernatant by SDS-PAGE, and fibrin zymography showed that the major fibrinolytic protein was the 27 kDa band. The gene (aprEBS2) encoding the major fibrinolytic protein was cloned, and overexpressed in heterologous hosts, B. subtilis WB600 and E. coli BL21 (DE3). B. subtilis transformant showed 1.5-fold higher fibrinolytic activity than B. velezensis BS2. Overproduced AprEBS2 in E. coli was purified by affinity chromatography. The optimum pH and temperature were pH 8.0 and 37oC, respectively. Km and Vmax were 0.15 mM and 39.68 μM/l/min, respectively, when N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA was used as the substrate. AprEBS2 has strong α-fibrinogenase and moderate β-fibrinogenase activity. Considering its high fibrinolytic activity, significant salt tolerance, and ability to grow at 10oC, B. velezensis BS2 can be used as a starter for jeotgal.
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Supplemental Data
Key_wordBacillus velezensis, fibrinolytic activity, sea squirt jeotgal, salt tolerance
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