Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2019 ; Vol.29-1: 151~159

AuthorJI Eun Ahn, Hangeun Kim, Dae Kyun Chung
Place of dutyGraduate School of Biotechnology and Institute of Life Science and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104, Republic of Korea
TitleLipoteichoic Acid Isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum Maintains Inflammatory Homeostasis through Regulation of Th1- and Th2- Induced Cytokines
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2019 ; Vol.29-1
AbstractLipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 (pLTA) alleviates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced excessive inflammation through inhibition of TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-6. In addition, pLTA increases the survival rate of mice in a septic shock model. In the current study, we have found that pLTA contributes to homeostasis through regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. In detail, pLTA decreased the production of IL-10 by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-differentiated THP-1 cells stimulated with prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and LPS. However, TNF-α production which was inhibited by PGE-2+LPS increased by pLTA treatment. The regulatory effects of IL-10 and TNF-α induced by PGE-2 and LPS in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were mediated by pLTA, but not by other LTAs isolated from either Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA) or L. sakei (sLTA). Further studies revealed that pLTA-mediated IL-10 inhibition and TNF-α induction in PGE-2+LPS-stimulated PMAdifferentiated THP-1 cells were mediated by dephosphorylation of p38 and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), respectively. Reduction of pLTA-mediated IL-10 inhibited the metastasis of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), which was induced by IL-10 or conditioned media prepared from PGE-2+LPS-stimulated PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that pLTA contributes to inflammatory homeostasis through induction of repressed pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as inhibition of excessive antiinflammatory cytokines.
Full-Text
Key_wordLipoteichoic acid, anti-inflammation, homeostasis, Interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, metastasis of breast cancer
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