Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2018 ; Vol.28-2: 218~226

AuthorDae-Woon Choi, Sun Young Jung, Jisu Kang, Young-Do Nam, Seong-Il Lim, Ki Tae Kim, Hee Soon Shin
Place of dutyFood Biotechnology Program, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34113, Republic of Korea,Division of Nutrition and Metabolism Research, Korea Food Research Institute, Wanju 55365, Republic of Korea
TitleImmune-Enhancing Effect of Nanometric Lactobacillus plantarum nF1 (nLp-nF1) in a Mouse Model of Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunosuppression
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2018 ; Vol.28-2
AbstractNanometric Lactobacillus plantarum nF1 (nLp-nF1) is a biogenics consisting of dead L. plantarum cells pretreated with heat and a nanodispersion process. In this study, we investigated the immune-enhancing effects of nLp-nF1 in vivo and in vitro. To evaluate the immunostimulatory effects of nLp-nF1, mice immunosuppressed by cyclophosphamide (CPP) treatment were administered with nLp-nF1. As expected, CPP restricted the immune response of mice, whereas oral administration of nLp-nF1 significantly increased the total IgG in the serum, and cytokine production (interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)) in bone marrow cells. Furthermore, nLp-nF1 enhanced the production of splenic cytokines such as IL-12, TNF-α, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In vitro, nLp-nF1 stimulated the immune response by enhancing the production of cytokines such as IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Moreover, nLp-nF1 given a food additive enhanced the immune responses when combined with various food materials in vitro. These results suggest that nLp-nF1 could be used to strengthen the immune system and recover normal immunity in people with a weak immune system, such as children, the elderly, and patients.
Full-Text
Key_wordNanometric Lactobacillus plantarum nF1, immune enhancement, interleukin-12, macrophage, immunoglobulin G, cyclophosphamide
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