Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology publishes the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

2015 ; Vol.25-9: 1476~1484

AuthorAndrey L. Rakitin, Alexandra Y. Ermakova, Nikolai V. Ravin
Place of dutyCentre “Bioengineering”, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312, Russia
TitleNovel Endoxylanases of the Moderately Thermophilic Polysaccharide-Degrading Bacterium Melioribacter roseus
PublicationInfo J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2015 ; Vol.25-9
AbstractThree endoxylanase-encoding genes from the moderately themophilic chemoorganotrophic bacterium Melioribacter roseus were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Genes xyl2091 (Mros_2091) and xyl2495 (Mros_2495) encode GH10 family hydrolases, whereas xyl2090 (Mros_2090) represents the GH30 family. In addition to catalytic domains, Xyl2090 and Xyl2091 contain carbohydrate-binding modules that could facilitate their binding to xylans and Por sorting domains associated with the sorting of proteins from the periplasm to the outer membrane, where they are covalently attached. Recombinant endoxylanase Xyl2495 exhibited a high specific activity of 1,920 U/mg on birchwood xylan at 40oC. It is active at low temperatures, exhibiting more than 30% of the maximal activity even at 0oC. Endoxylanases Xyl2090 and Xyl2091 have lower specific activities but higher temperature optima at 80oC and 65oC, respectively. Analysis of xylan hydrolysis products revealed that Xyl2090 generates xylo-oligosaccharides longer than xylopentaose. Xylose and xylobiose are the major products of xylan hydrolysis by the recombinant Xyl2091 and Xyl2495. No activity against cellulose was observed for all enzymes. The presence of three xylanases ensures efficient xylan hydrolysis by M. roseus. The highly processive “free” endoxylanase Xyl2495 could hydrolyze xylan under moderate temperatures. Xylan hydrolysis at elevated temperatures could be accomplished by concerted action of two cell-bound xylanases; Xyl2090 that probably degrades xylans to long xylo-oligosaccharides, and Xyl2091 hydrolyzing them to xylose and xylobiose. The new endoxylanases could be useful for saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass in biofuels production, bleaching of paper pulp, and obtaining low molecular weight xylooligosaccharides.
Full-Text
Key_wordXylan, endoxylanase, thermostability, thermophilic bacterium
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